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Archetypal structure in mushroom or psilocybin art and fairy art mindprint in modern art

Lindy Kehoe’s Serendipity Circus art of surreal meaning

Artist Lindy Kehoe’s Serendipity Circus artwork integrates an unusually large number of general themes. This post includes some comments on her programme and style by the artist herself, and the archetypal structuralist analysis of one of her works.

Artist Lindy Kehoe’s child-styled artwork Serendipity Circus, pictures a semi-visionary dynamic, innocent and joyful moment of children and animals on rowdy, surreal parade in a garden. Her illustrative style is similar to Mark Chagall. She told Mindprint Art: “Chagall has represented a brother to me, in the dream-like trance state I experience when I paint, and when I saw his works first-hand. I have a deep fascination with tracing our hidden roots in etymology, and unveiling patterns and codes that flow from creation and creatives in the collective.” Some time ago she wrote of being ‘immersed in my own mythology… alive in a living story… attempting to weave the fabric of an old tapestry… wanting to be seen, heard, remembered; a story-keeper… to tell a Lemurian fairy-tale of heaven and earth… bringing alive the mythos of others through illustration… to conceive guardians we need, to protect our innocent courage… [in] the multi-dimensional holographic landscapes of dream-time.’

Lindy Kehoe; Serendipity Circus. The artwork subconsciously expresses a high level of integration among nine of the sixteen archetypal themes, typical of visionary or trance artists. her style is similar to Chagall, whom she visualises as a ‘brother’ (after http://www.lindykehoe.com and IG lindy_kehoe_art, with permission. Archetype labels and axial grid by E Furter).

Type Label; Character (archetypal features):

1 Builder; Peacock (bird) on one leg (twist). And cat E.

2c Basket; Vine (weave) with pods (containers, cluster). And cats A, C, and D. And peacock feathers. And trumpet (container). C-types are off the axial grid, but between specific axes.

3 Queen; Tree-cat B (queen?) tall (neck long).

4 King; Vine leaf–eye A, one of two (twins).

5a Priest; Leaf eye.

5b Priest; Rabbit, violet (colour, not counted here due to abundance) with cymbals (priest, hyperactive) leading parade (assembly).

5c Basket Tail; Rabbit’s cymbals (discs). And rabbit fluffy tail (tail).

6 Exile; Tortoise (reptile).

7 Child; Snake (‘rope’, unfold).

7g Gal.Centre; Dog’s forepaws (limb joints, path).

8 Healer; Dog (canid) jumping (bent forward).

9c Basket Lid; Red fly agaric mushrooms (disc, lid) of trance (trance, reveal). And mushrooms (disc). And sea star (lid).

10 Teacher; Seed pods? And dog-tail (canid) as a serpent (snake), waving a stick (staff) in parade (carousel).

11 Womb; Mother giraffe midriff (womb).

12 Heart; Drummer clown child marching.

13 Heart; Mother giraffe chest (heart).

13c Basket Head; Elf (oracle) child with cap (hat, lid) picking inverted vine (tree). And candy-striped mountain peak cap. And cats G and H.

14 Mixer; Trumpeter (time, see Midsummer marker below) marching (dance), with feathers (angel) and peacock (bird) and banner, near the centre (ingress), left eye. And cat F.

15 Maker; Trumpeter marching (rampant, order), large face (face), right eye, with feathers (winged), with banner (sceptre, order). And heart on banner staff (sceptre) with motto (order). And sun face (face).

Axial centre; Trumpeter’s elbow (limb-joint).

4p Gal.S.Pole; Standard staff base (juncture).

11p Gal.Pole; Drummer child’s jaw (limb-joint).

Midsummer; Trumpeter’s jaw (limb-joint).

Midwinter; Unmarked. The solstice axle is on the vertical plane. These markers place midsummer between 14-15, analogous to Cancer-Gemini, thus spring and the cultural time-frame in Age Aries-Pisces, typical of many works made in Age Pisces, particularly towards the end of Age Pisces (which ended in 2016).

Some themes interlock

Kehoe’s Serendipity Circus artwork has an unusually large number of general themes, indicated by extra features of nine types:

3 Queen, typical of long necks (here seven cats and a giraffe), spring (garden);

4 King, of sun, bird, field;

5 Priest, of colours, ritual (parade), hyperactive, assembly, reptile (tortoise, snake), winged (two birds, trumpeter’s feathers);

6 Exile, of horns (caps, and cats’ vine-horns), reptile (tortoise, snake), tree (garden);

7 Child, of bag (two flags), juvenile (two children, young animals);

8/9 Healer, of pillars (tree-cats), disc (turtle, sea-stars);

10 Teacher, of raised arms (of rabbit, two children, dove and elf child), staff (two flag-posts), hunt-master (noise flushing out animals), guard (parade), ecology (fauna and flora), carousel (parade circle);

14 Mixer, of time (serendipity in the title), transform (trumpeter as bird, animals as musicians), tree (garden), felid (many cats), reptile (turtle, snake), dance (parade);

15 Maker, of rampant posture (marching), or order (flags and parade).

Yet another general theme is the four transitional fields, off the axial grid but between specific axes:

2c Basket, of weave (here feathers and vines), instrument (trumpet, drum, cymbals, flags), hat (caps, bells); and its opposite 9c Basket Lid, of discs (cymbals, turtle, sea-stars);

5c Basket Tail, of trees or herbs (garden); and its opposite 13c Basket Head of oracles (sigil on the tortoise back).

Expressing a large number of general themes is typical of visionary, trance, mescaline, psilocybin, ayahuasca or DMT art, often at the cost of leaving some individual character features at minimalist levels. Thematic integration indicates artistic and probably individual maturity.

General themes reveal that nature and culture tend to re-use certain slightly ambiguous features (particularly reptile, bird, felid, horns) in expressions of overlapping themes; while other ambiguous themes, such as equid, are reserved for other works.

  • Structuralist features of expression are universal, and subconscious to artists, architects, builders, crafters and members of any culture.
  • See similar themes and styling in mushroom or psilocybin art in other posts on http://www.mindprintart.wordpress.com
  • See similar themes and styling by Chagall in forthcoming posts.
  • See archetypal structuralist analysises of artworks in styles associated with mushrooms, child cartoons, sugar or candy, fairies, mescaline, ayahuasca, and DMT, on http://www.mindprintart.wordpress.com and on http://www.stoneprintjournal.blog

By Edmond Furter

Edmond Furter wrote the book Mindprint, the subconscious art code (2014, Lulu.com), to demonstrate five layers of recurrent features in 200 artworks of all cultures and Ages, revealing the archetypal core content of culture. His second book, Stoneprint, the human code in art, buildings and cities (2016, Four Equators Media), expands demonstrations of the subconscious expression of archetypal structure to houses, temples, monuments, pyramid fields, geoglyphs, villages, cities and regions. The same structure also appears in mythology, such as Babylonian building rituals; and in reflexology points in our hands and irises, thus in nature. Stoneprint also demonstrates that the periodic table is a kind of natural 'culture', and that culture is a natural 'species' of behaviour. The structure in our works is as rigorous as grammar or DNA.
The books Mindprint, and Stoneprint, and editions of the structuralist anthropology periodical, Stoneprint Journal (some of which are available on Lulu.com), draw on extensive research in iconography, archaeology, history, esoterica, astronomy, art history and structuralist anthropology, spanning 26 years.
The core content of culture includes about 100 recurrent features of the sixteen main types, their sequence, five polar markers, and a time-frame orientation, that nature, individuals and societies subconsciously and compulsively express in all media. The mindprint or stoneprint model of structuralist anthropology has several major implications for all the human sciences, and offers a theoretical bases for a holistic approach to the study of the cultural record. Edmond Furter works as a freelance researcher and editor in Johannesburg.
Order the book Mindprint at $30, or the book Stoneprint at $30, or editions of Stoneprint Journal at $5, plus postage, on edmondfurter at gmail dot com; or Mindprint, or Stoneprint Journal editions on Lulu.com

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